Identity

Your Business Identity

Although these three concepts are inseparable, we have to start somewhere, so let’s look first at your business identity. This is what makes your business different from all others. What you want, what you do well, how you do things, what makes you unique. What you want to do with your core strategy is establish...


Look At the Mirror

You have to understand what you do and who you are if you are going to be able to set your business apart from its competition. The exercise is something like looking at a mirror. Gather your team together, if you have a team ready, because this makes for a good discussion. Ask some of...


Identify Your Core Competencies

To determine your core competencies, take another look at the mirror. Take a step away from the business, and get a new fresh look at it. What things do you do best? Let’s consider a few companies most people know: We might reasonably think a core competency of Apple Computer is design, a core competency...


Guy Kawasaki on Mission Statements

The fundamental shortcoming of most mission statements is that everyone expects them to be highfalutin and all-encompassing. The result is a long, boring, commonplace, and pointless joke. In The Mission Statement Book, Jeffrey Abrams provides 301 examples of mission statements that demonstrate that companies are all writing the same mediocre stuff. To wit, this is...


Mantras Versus Missions

We focus too much attention on mission statements. Too often they distract us from the real business of bearing down on why and how we’re different, particularly when taken from the customers’ point of view. The mission tends to be meaningless fluffy words. Here’s a good test: take your mission statement and ask yourself, honestly,...


Keys to Success

Like the artist squinting to view the landscape better, or differently, as you build your sense of business identity, try to focus on keys to success. Keep it to just two or three key priorities that make the difference. Some of this will depend on your industry, but there’s a lot more to it than that. For...


Use a SWOT Analysis

SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. I particularly like the SWOT analysis because it’s easy to understand and very quickly gets a team involved in strategic thinking. Notice that there’s a big difference between the first two and last two components. Strengths and weaknesses are internal. They are part of your company identity....


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