The fundamental shortcoming of most mission statements is that everyone expects them to be highfalutin and all-encompassing. The result is a long, boring, commonplace, and pointless joke.

In The Mission Statement Book, Jeffrey Abrams provides 301 examples of mission statements that demonstrate that companies are all writing the same mediocre stuff. To wit, this is a partial list of the frequency with which mission statements in Abrams’s sample contained the same words:

  • best – 94
  • communities – 97
  • customers – 211
  • excellence – 77
  • leader – 106
  • quality – 169

Fortune (or Forbes, in my case) favors the bold, so I’ll give you some advice that will make life easy for you: Postpone writing your mission statement. You can come up with it later when you’re successful and have lots of time and money to waste. (If you’re not successful, it won’t matter that you didn’t develop one.)

Make Meaning : The Art of the Start

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Tim BerryTim Berry
Tim Berry

Tim Berry is the founder and chairman of Palo Alto Software and Bplans.com. Follow him on Twitter @Timberry.