How to Ask Family and Friends to Fund Your Business 2

Asking for help is one thing; asking for financial help is another beast all its own. Yet many entrepreneurs turn to family and friends to help fund their business.

A recent study from the National Knowledge Commission shows that 63 percent of entrepreneurs “self-financed” their business, but that doesn’t mean every owner saved up their own money. Upon closer investigation, at least half of these entrepreneurs asked friends and family for financial support.

Tom Scarda, a business consultant, offers tips to ask friends and family to fund your business.

Tom Scarda, a business consultant, offers tips to ask friends and family to fund your business.

Tom Scarda, a business consultant who helps prospective entrepreneurs find the right franchise through FranChoice, says a lot of entrepreneurs hit up friends and family for capital.

“Most friends and family say yes to a person asking to finance a business,” he says. That is, “until it comes time to write a check.”

If you want your loved ones to buy into the business, you need to get over the awkward feelings of asking for help and convince them that you’re serious about this business and have a plan to make it successful, Scarda says.

To do so, you’ll want to follow these tips to ask friends and family for startup cash:

1. Have a solid business plan

Whether you’re asking your best friend or going to the Bank of Mom and Dad, you need to treat the discussion like you would with a banker. You wouldn’t get a bank loan without a business plan, and you shouldn’t expect others to make an investment without one either. A business plan sets clear goals for your business and shows prospective investors how you plan to make a profit.

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2. Ask for enough money

When you’re asking friends and family to part with their hard-earned cash, your instinct is probably to ask for as little as possible, but Scarda says this is the wrong approach. If you don’t have enough money to start the business, it won’t succeed. Scarda says you need to consider three pools of money:

  • Initial investment: Money needed to get the business ready for customers.
  • Working capital: Money needed to keep the business going until you hit your break-even point.
  • Home capital: Money needed to personally survive while the business is launched. You need money to pay your own bills—don’t forget this piece! A six-month reserve is a good rule of thumb, Scarda says.

3. Make a payment plan

How do you plan to repay your family of investors? Figure out a plan to pay everyone back, with interest. Scarda suggests scheduling the first payment six months after the business opens.

The plan should also include “what ifs”: What if you can’t make a payment one month? What’s the plan then? By having these issues worked out ahead of time, you’ll save problems down the road. Put it all in writing, too. A legal document is best.

4. Expect investors to take an active role

The friends and family that contribute to the business may want a say in how things are done. It’s something you should discuss before taking any money. Investors, even if they are your parents, will want to protect their investment. Expect them to check in, ask questions about the business, and give you unsolicited advice. Don’t take it personally, Scarda says—it’s a business relationship, and you should treat it as such.

Above all else, you want to show your family that you are professional and prepared. Show them you’re ready for the big time by having all the necessary documents and by answering any questions they have.

 

About the Author Lisa Furgison is a journalist with a decade of experience in all facets of media. Follow Lisa on Google+ Read more »

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  • http://www.liveplan.com/ Noah Parsons

    Great article, Lisa. I would an extra point as well: always have a contract. Especially if you are borrowing from people who are close to you, having everything detailed in writing ahead of time can save tons of time and potential heartache later on down the road if things don’t go quite as planned.

    A very closely related issue is to make sure to be fully aware of all the legal issues with raising money from friends and family. If you are issuing equity (providing shares of your company in exchange for investment), there are several legal issues that need to be dealt with. It’s worth consulting an attorney to make sure you are following the rules when you are raising money.

  • Lisa Furgison

    Excellent point, Noah. It’s certainly a good idea to consult an attorney and make sure all of the legal bases are covered.